Is acne vulgaris an inflammatory disease?

Emerging data indicate that acne vulgaris is a primary inflammatory disease, with histological, immunological, and clinical evidence suggesting that inflammation occurs at all stages of acne lesion development.

Is acne vulgaris inflammatory?

Acne vulgaris is a common chronic skin disease involving blockage and/or inflammation of pilosebaceous units (hair follicles and their accompanying sebaceous gland). Acne can present as noninflammatory lesions, inflammatory lesions, or a mixture of both, affecting mostly the face but also the back and chest.

Can inflammatory disease cause acne?

Inflammatory acne occurs when bacteria infect clogged or closed pores, which causes the immune system to react to combat the bacteria, leading to inflammation and, at times, more severe types of blemishes like cysts.

What type of disease is acne?

Acne is a disorder of the hair follicles and oil glands (sebaceous glands). The sebaceous glands secrete oils (sebum) to keep the skin moist. When the glands get clogged, it can lead to pimples and cysts. Acne is very common.

What type of inflammation causes acne?

Inflamed acne consists of swelling, redness, and pores that are deeply clogged with bacteria, oil, and dead skin cells. Sometimes, bacteria called Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) can cause inflamed acne, too.

Why acne vulgaris is caused?

Acne develops when sebum — an oily substance that lubricates your hair and skin — and dead skin cells plug hair follicles. Bacteria can trigger inflammation and infection resulting in more severe acne.

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