Is it normal for your face to peel after a sunburn?

Peeling is the body’s way of repairing damaged cells. Peeling skin is harmless and helps the healing process, but it can be itchy and uncomfortable. Peeling skin is a common problem after a sunburn.

What happens if I peel my sunburn on my face?

The correct answer is “no.” If you are unlucky enough to have a sunburn that peels, you should resist the urge to peel off pieces of your skin as it heals. Although peeling may seem harmless, it can actually further damage your skin and make it more vulnerable to infection.

How do you fix peeling skin from sunburn?

Take cool showers or baths to cool the skin and temporarily relieve the pain. Apply cold compresses. Gently slather on store-bought pure aloe vera gel, especially after a shower. Aloe vera acts as an anti-inflammatory as well as a moisturizer and may reduce the amount of peeling you face later on.

How long does it take for your face to peel after a sunburn?

After you’ve been burned, the skin will normally start to flake and peel after about three days. Once peeling starts, it can last for several days. In general, peeling will stop when the skin is fully healed.

Does peeling take away your tan?

“Our skin is very intelligent,” says Millward. “If it has been burnt it will start to repair the damage by creating new cells as fast as possible and shedding the damaged ones before they can turn cancerous. This is when the skin peels and you actually lose your tan faster.”

INTERESTING:  Is it good to apply sunscreen after face wash?

Should you let your skin peel after sunburn?

Curcio says this isn’t a good idea. “Do not pull off your peeling skin, and avoid active exfoliation,” she says. “Instead, allow it to slough off your body on its own. Peeling usually stops when the burn has healed — about seven days for mild to moderate burns.”

Does peeling sunburn scar?

“Peeling sunburned skin can increase the risk for scarring because the skin does not always peel at the same rate,” explains Debra Wattenberg, M.D., a New York City-based dermatologist who is board-certified with the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). “It’s best to let the dead skin exfoliate on its own.”